Home Al's Home  Page Tidbit of the Week Tech & Future, 9th ed.
Bookstore Teichs on the Web Tidbit Archive Resources
Alvin M. Weinberg
Chapter 4.  Can Technology Replace Social Engineering?
Alvin M. Weinberg Alvin Weinberg was director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1955 to 1973. During this time he served as a member of the President's Science Advisory Committee and made many contributions to science policy.  From 1975-1985, Weinberg served as director of the Institute for Energy Analysis (IEA), of Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) which pioneered investigations of the greenhouse effect, alternate energy sources, and energy conservation. In 1985, he retired as director and was named ORAU distinguished fellow, a title he still holds today. 

Weinberg is a recipient of the Atoms for Peace Award, the Harvey Prize, the Heinrich Award, and the Fermi Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and a Foreign Member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences.  Weinberg received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago and worked on the Manhattan Project during the Second World War.


Links:

Article from the ORNL Review describing his life and contributions to the laboratory on the occasion of his 80th birthday in April 1995, including several photos and a review of his autobiography, The First Nuclear Era: The Life and Times of a Technological Fixer.

Another review of The First Nuclear Era; by Mike Moore in The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (January/February 1996).

Weinberg's foreword to a special issue of the ORNL Review honoring the lab's first 50 years.

Profile on the ORNL site.

Weinberg's listing in the membership directory of the National Academy of Engineering.

Letter from the chair of the honors and awards committee of the American Nuclear Society soliciting nominations for the Alvin M. Weinberg medal, which was created in 1995.


Back to Technology & the Future Contents

Updated December 28, 2002